The start of the new year places us in the icy throes of winter, when the drafty inadequacies of older, original windows make themselves evident. This is when the thoughts of many home- and business owners turn to installing either “replacement” or “new” windows.

As reported elsewhere, replacement windows are designed to fit the existing opening and specified when you only want to remove your old or poor-quality windows without disturbing the surrounding trim and/or frame.

Contrarily, new windows are specified if you wish to change the dimensions of the openings to accommodate completely new window styles and shapes.

After deciding between new and replacement windows, the next decision is the style or type. The four most popular types are:

Single- and double-hung windows

Single- and double-hung windows are the most common. They’re composed of two separate frames, called “sashes,” each of which contains a glass pane. If both sashes can move up and down, the window is called “double-hung.” If only the bottom sash can be moved, it’s called “single-hung.” The advantage of a double- over a single-hung window is better ventilation, which you can achieve by opening both the bottom and top sashes. Double-hung widows are also safer for children, as you can leave the bottom safely closed and air the room solely through the top sash.

Casement Windows

Casement windows are probably the second-most common. They’re typically composed of a large framed pane, taller than it’s wide, and hinged along one side. They open by swinging door-like, controlled with a hand crank, lever, or similar mechanism.

Casement windows are a preferred decor feature for many architects and designers because they can be much taller than single- or double-hung windows, even floor-to-ceiling. They also admit more light and air, since they open door-like with no horizontal interruptions.

Awning windows

Less common—at least in the Midwest—are awning windows, which are hinged at the top and are opened by tilting out from the bottom. This effectively creates an “awning” that allows you to leave them open during rain. Also, the design lends itself to better sealing against air and moisture. For this reason, awning windows are ideal in particularly wet environments.

Slider windows

Slider windows—also known as “gliders”—have no springs, pulleys, or other mechanisms for opening and closing, making them a low-maintenance, cost-effective choice for residential homes. You just release a latch and slide the window open Sliders offer many of the advantages of casements but open from side to side, so work well when there’s limited outside space to swing a window open. They aren’t heavy, so easily glide along the window frame, requiring very little effort, strength, or dexterity to open or close.

Did You Know?

Genesis Exteriors craftsmen have been providing quality remodeling services to Dane County and South Central Wisconsin homeowners and businesses since 2004, having completed over 1000 exterior remodeling projects in the last five years alone: roofs, siding, windows, doors, and gutters.

Our crew supervisors have a minimum of 15 years experience each. In addition we are:

  • Licensed, bonded, and insured in the State of Wisconsin
  • Recipient of the Angie’s List® Super Service Award in 2010 and 2011 and 2012
  • Registered in Wisconsin under the S & B Building Contractor Program, which ensures that all work completed at your home or business will meet the latest state codes and building requirements (registration #10657 d.b.a. Everyday Interiors)

Find out more.